Literary Rogues: A Scandalous History of Wayward Authors

Literary Rogues: A Scandalous History of Wayward Authors

In Great Philosophers Who Failed at Love, Andrew Shaffer explored the romantic failures of some of the great minds in history. Now, in Literary Rogues, he turns his unflinching eye and wit to explore our love-hate relationship with literature's most contrarian, drunken, vulgar, and just plain rude bad boys (and girls) in this very funny and shockingly true compendium of literary misbehavior.

Vice wasn't always the domain of rock stars, rappers, and actors. There was a time when writers fought both with words and fists, a time when writing was synonymous with drinking and early mortality. The very mad geniuses whose books are studied in schools around the world are the very ones who fell in love repeatedly, and either outright killed themselves or drank or drugged themselves as close to death's door as they could possibly get. Literary Rogues turns back the clock to celebrate historical and living legends of Western literature, such as: Edgar Allan Poe, Oscar Wilde, Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Dorothy Parker, Hunter S. Thompson, and Bret Easton Ellis.

Part nostalgia, part serious history of Western literary movements, and Literary Rogues is a wholly raucous celebration of oft-vilified writers and their work, brimming with interviews, research, and personality.

Title:Literary Rogues: A Scandalous History of Wayward Authors
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780062077288
Format Type:

    Literary Rogues: A Scandalous History of Wayward Authors Reviews

  • Gloria

    In a world obsessed with celebrities (and the trainwrecks which often are their lives), it's no wonder a book like this is put out.Granted, curiosity plays a part in checking out such a collection, bu...

  • Jenn Ravey

    From thepickygirl.com:*This book was offered to me via the publisher, Harper Perennial, in exchange for an honest review.In January, a friend and I went to a Half Price Books. We separated, looking at...

  • Alvin

    This starts out OK, detailing the debauchery of 18th & 19th century authors like Shelley, Balzac, and Poe, who led quite dramatic lives. I lost interest when it got to the early 20th century authors (...

  • Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    Literary Rogues consists of portraits of the 'bad boys' of literature, though some women, too, merit a place within these pages. These are the authors with wild lifestyles, drug habits, and an endless...

  • Casia Courtier

    I recieved this First Reads Goodreads Giveaway book for an honest review.Nonfiction tends to be the bane of my existence. It never fails, I am always lagging behind in a nonfiction book and become dis...

  • Celia

    I loved this book! It is a fantastic compilation of the bad boys and bad girls of literature. It was packed full of stories and tidbits of authors such as Dorothy Parker, Oscar Wilde, Edgar Allen Poe,...

  • Brian Willis

    A fun, whimsical look at the sordid private lives of famous authors and poets. Though I knew some of these stories, I still shake my head in astonishment at how far substance abuse and madness can go....

  • Jason Robinson

    An entertaining read about literature's bad boys (and girls). Lifestyles written about may be hazardous to your health!...

  • Brian Bixler

    Andrew Shaffer's "Literary Rogues" is an easy read with highly liftable quotes and engaging anecdotes about some of the greatest literary minds of the last two centuries. However, it wasn't exactly th...

  • Kris

    If you are a lit buff, there is nothing in these pages that will come as any surprise to you. The book is a fun, quick ride. Brief bios of all kinds of men (and a sprinkling of women) who led colorful...